ROTR lottery needs to end.

whiporee

DIS Veteran
Joined
Aug 16, 2012
I like the virtual queue. I think that the boarding group system is really effective. I **LIKE** how you don't have to physically wait in line for hours and hours just to go on the one ride. I **LIKE** how, instead of waiting in the physical line, I can do OTHER stuff in Star Wars land or in the rest of HS while we wait for our BG to be called. Star Wars land has a lot of cool stuff to experience, cool stuff to do, cool stuff to explore.

Right now, at least, I hope they don't bring bac FP+ and if some kind of FP does come back, I hope that ROTR sticks with the BG system for awhile.

I **LIKE** that the BG system applies to everyone, how NOBODY gets preferential treatment. I like how you can't skip the virtual queue line by paying for a VIP tour.

In my opinion, what everybody needs to consider is shifting their focus. Instead of the thought process being "OMG, if we don't get a ROTR BG, then our trip is totally ruined and this is all going to suck," the focus should be something like "We're going to have a fun day at HS and if we luck out and get a ROTR BG, then that'll be icing on the cake, but if we don't get a BG, we're still going to have a great day."

If you want to increase your odds of getting a BG, be strategic about it and go to DL or WDW at a time of year that has fewer crowds. On top of that, plan on going to HS on multiple days of your trip instead of just one day. Get multiple people in your group to try for a BG at the same time on different phones. Etc., etc.

But also expect that EVEN IF YOU DO ALL OF THOSE THINGS, YOU STILL MIGHT NOT GET A BG!

Manage your expectations. Set proper expectations ahead of time with other people in your group.
Unless you've had the experience of not getting a group on the days you're there -- unless you've had the experience of telling someone who really wanted to do this attraction, "it's okay, we'll have fun anyway" -- then you're missing half the story. It's easy for people who have advantages -- either through luck or technology or proximity -- to tell those who don't how they should feel, and that they should adjust their expectations.

Because of course it gives preferential treatment. It give it to people who spend a lot of time of message boards and learn the tricks about signing up. It rewards people who have a faster CPU or a faster internet connection. It rewards people who have multiple opportunities to visit, so missing on that one shot isn't as big a deal, or people who can afford to reschedule their plans and try again the next day. it gives plenty of preferential treatment.

It's interesting to read that someone who has some degree of that preferential treatment -- either through research or connection or luck -- disparage another form of preferential treatment in terms of money. My advantage is okay, but yours not so much.

We hear a lot from people who have been successful saying how fair they think it is; we rarely hear the same from those who missed out for their foreseeable future. This system sucks. it's unfair to those who don't know they have to research how to sign up, it's unfair to those who have slower CPUs or connection speeds, it's unfair to those who spend their money and then just end up unlucky. It's unfortunate that those who praise it are those who have found a way to game it, but I do wish they'd show a little empathy for those who were not as quick on the gaming it draw.
 

VandVsmama

DIS Veteran
Joined
Mar 28, 2011
Unless you've had the experience of not getting a group on the days you're there -- unless you've had the experience of telling someone who really wanted to do this attraction, "it's okay, we'll have fun anyway" -- then you're missing half the story. It's easy for people who have advantages -- either through luck or technology or proximity -- to tell those who don't how they should feel, and that they should adjust their expectations.

Because of course it gives preferential treatment. It give it to people who spend a lot of time of message boards and learn the tricks about signing up. It rewards people who have a faster CPU or a faster internet connection. It rewards people who have multiple opportunities to visit, so missing on that one shot isn't as big a deal, or people who can afford to reschedule their plans and try again the next day. it gives plenty of preferential treatment.

It's interesting to read that someone who has some degree of that preferential treatment -- either through research or connection or luck -- disparage another form of preferential treatment in terms of money. My advantage is okay, but yours not so much.

We hear a lot from people who have been successful saying how fair they think it is; we rarely hear the same from those who missed out for their foreseeable future. This system sucks. it's unfair to those who don't know they have to research how to sign up, it's unfair to those who have slower CPUs or connection speeds, it's unfair to those who spend their money and then just end up unlucky. It's unfortunate that those who praise it are those who have found a way to game it, but I do wish they'd show a little empathy for those who were not as quick on the gaming it draw.
I **HAVE** been in the situation you describe...trying for a BG and not getting one. I HAVE had to explain to my kids that we didn't get a BG.

If you don't like the current system, contact Disney directly and raise your concern with them. Perhaps if more guests like yourself speak up, then they will reconsider how it's handled.
 

Racergirl24

Earning My Ears
Joined
Mar 9, 2020
I **HAVE** been in the situation you describe...trying for a BG and not getting one. I HAVE had to explain to my kids that we didn't get a BG.

If you don't like the current system, contact Disney directly and raise your concern with them. Perhaps if more guests like yourself speak up, then they will reconsider how it's handled.
I totally agree.
I have seen an 80 year old man get a boarding group on main street at Disneyland........

Preferential process? (The previous poster)
Disney could never offer 100% of all visitors a ride. Are you seriously thinking they should? Or are you just upset that you don't have an advantage?
Agree to disagree and I still think the system is VERY fair. (Repeat....if the VIP guests don't get a pass.......it's fair).
 

trivan

Mouseketeer
Joined
Jul 1, 2014
it's unfair to those who have slower CPUs or connection speeds, it's unfair to those who spend their money and then just end up unlucky.
While tech does help, I think understanding the process is even a greater benefit. Me: Iphone 11 on AT&T data, my daughter was on her iPhone 8 on the hotel wifi, which was a lot slower then my connection. She was able to be me to a boarding group. In fact I've never gotten a BG and I have the best tech of the family (I get teased a lot for that). So its not just tech.
 
  • VandVsmama

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 28, 2011
    Unless you've had the experience of not getting a group on the days you're there -- unless you've had the experience of telling someone who really wanted to do this attraction, "it's okay, we'll have fun anyway" -- then you're missing half the story. It's easy for people who have advantages -- either through luck or technology or proximity -- to tell those who don't how they should feel, and that they should adjust their expectations.

    Because of course it gives preferential treatment. It give it to people who spend a lot of time of message boards and learn the tricks about signing up. It rewards people who have a faster CPU or a faster internet connection. It rewards people who have multiple opportunities to visit, so missing on that one shot isn't as big a deal, or people who can afford to reschedule their plans and try again the next day. it gives plenty of preferential treatment.

    It's interesting to read that someone who has some degree of that preferential treatment -- either through research or connection or luck -- disparage another form of preferential treatment in terms of money. My advantage is okay, but yours not so much.

    We hear a lot from people who have been successful saying how fair they think it is; we rarely hear the same from those who missed out for their foreseeable future. This system sucks. it's unfair to those who don't know they have to research how to sign up, it's unfair to those who have slower CPUs or connection speeds, it's unfair to those who spend their money and then just end up unlucky. It's unfortunate that those who praise it are those who have found a way to game it, but I do wish they'd show a little empathy for those who were not as quick on the gaming it draw.
    One could make a similar argument about the FP system. For example, one could argue:

    • "It's UNFAIR to those who don't know they have to research how to use FP."
    • "It's UNFAIR that people who stay on site get to book FP+ a whole month before the rest of us do."
    • "It's UNFAIR that Disney doesn't call me/text me/message me via carrier pigeon to warn me before I get there that there's FP+."
    • "It's UNFAIR that some people have to go to a kiosk to get a FP."
    • "It's UNFAIR that Disneyland offered a MaxPass system."
    • "It's UNFAIR that people can skip the line with a VIP tour guide."
    • "It's UNFAIR that Disney expected me to read their website and read my email before I got there so I'd know how the system works."
    • "It's UNFAIR to people who aren't on Disboards."
     

    whiporee

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 16, 2012
    One could make a similar argument about the FP system. For example, one could argue:

    • "It's UNFAIR to those who don't know they have to research how to use FP."
    • "It's UNFAIR that people who stay on site get to book FP+ a whole month before the rest of us do."
    • "It's UNFAIR that Disney doesn't call me/text me/message me via carrier pigeon to warn me before I get there that there's FP+."
    • "It's UNFAIR that some people have to go to a kiosk to get a FP."
    • "It's UNFAIR that Disneyland offered a MaxPass system."
    • "It's UNFAIR that people can skip the line with a VIP tour guide."
    • "It's UNFAIR that Disney expected me to read their website and read my email before I got there so I'd know how the system works."
    • "It's UNFAIR to people who aren't on Disboards."
    Without a fast pass, you can still ride.

    without a boarding pass, you can’t.

    if they had a standby option, then it’s a non issue. They don’t, so it is. Rise of the Resusrence is the ONLY ride you simply can’t do if you’re unlucky. You can wait all day for anything else if you want. But you can’t for that one. And that sucks, especially for people who, unlike you, don’t have the flexibility in time or resources to simply try again.
     

    Lupin

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Jul 20, 2009
    The only tweak it needs is to allow ride virgins priority boarding. Otherwise it’s a good system compared to waiting in line. When people ride dozens of times to the exclusion of people who have never been on it, I think that just stinks.
    Can't agree more with this. I think the virtual queue is far better than standing in line for hours but if someone is paying all that money to stay on property and visit the theme parks then they should be granted at least one chance to experience it.
     

    Grumpy by Birth

    Happy by choice
    Joined
    May 27, 2017
    Can't agree more with this. I think the virtual queue is far better than standing in line for hours but if someone is paying all that money to stay on property and visit the theme parks then they should be granted at least one chance to experience it.
    The problem is that there are thousands of people who are "paying all that money to stay on property and visit the theme parks." There literally isn't enough capacity to ensure all of them can ride. And if they adjust the system to favor onsite, someone else will chime in and say that it's not fair to those who stay offsite.
     
  • trivan

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Jul 1, 2014
    Can't agree more with this. I think the virtual queue is far better than standing in line for hours but if someone is paying all that money to stay on property and visit the theme parks then they should be granted at least one chance to experience it.
    What would happen if it’s on your last day and the ride breaks down and you didnt get to ride? I think a lot more people would be complaining then on this forum.

    If a first time rider has a better chance then one who has ridden, who to say those numbers are just as great and prevents you from getting a boarding group as well. I really believe those people who ride multiple times to make a difference are few and far between. One person who has ridden 100+ times isn‘t a factor. Each day that person has just as much of a chance to ride as the next.
     

    Nabas

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 5, 2013
    The problem is that there are thousands of people who are "paying all that money to stay on property and visit the theme parks." There literally isn't enough capacity to ensure all of them can ride. And if they adjust the system to favor onsite, someone else will chime in and say that it's not fair to those who stay offsite.
    ROTR seems to be handling about 1500 riders per hour, perhaps 15,000 people in a 10-hour day (10 AM to 8 PM).

    Pre-COVID, average DHS attendance was about double that.
     

    Carol_

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 29, 2019
    All of you who are saying people who have already ridden should not get priority...how are they going to track it? I just see new accounts being made to avoid that.
    The people getting >12 BGs per month most likely have APs that can be tracked. Anybody so dedicated to riding that they’ll buy tix attached to new accounts can and should “go on with their bad selves.” Not every obsessed fan can be stopped from working around a more equitable system.
     

    whiporee

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 16, 2012
    ROTR seems to be handling about 1500 riders per hour, perhaps 15,000 people in a 10-hour day (10 AM to 8 PM).

    Pre-COVID, average DHS attendance was about double that.
    Where are you finding that number? Did it come from Len?

    Not doubting your info, just that it seems like a low number for WDW to design an attraction that, by definition, will leave out 50 percent of daily attendees.
     

    Nabas

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 5, 2013
    Where are you finding that number? Did it come from Len?

    Not doubting your info, just that it seems like a low number for WDW to design an attraction that, by definition, will leave out 50 percent of daily attendees.
    Yes, Len. He was posting about it recently on another fan website.

    What he wrote was:

    728 riders in the half-hour between 11:55 AM and 12:25 PM. That's 1,458 riders per hour.​

    Another well-known and highly respected poster on that website wrote that the theoretical capacity (i.e. THRC) was designed to be around 2100 per hour.
     

    Grumpy Mouse

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Jun 18, 2020
    Unless you've had the experience of not getting a group on the days you're there -- unless you've had the experience of telling someone who really wanted to do this attraction, "it's okay, we'll have fun anyway" -- then you're missing half the story. It's easy for people who have advantages -- either through luck or technology or proximity -- to tell those who don't how they should feel, and that they should adjust their expectations.

    Because of course it gives preferential treatment. It give it to people who spend a lot of time of message boards and learn the tricks about signing up. It rewards people who have a faster CPU or a faster internet connection. It rewards people who have multiple opportunities to visit, so missing on that one shot isn't as big a deal, or people who can afford to reschedule their plans and try again the next day. it gives plenty of preferential treatment.

    It's interesting to read that someone who has some degree of that preferential treatment -- either through research or connection or luck -- disparage another form of preferential treatment in terms of money. My advantage is okay, but yours not so much.

    We hear a lot from people who have been successful saying how fair they think it is; we rarely hear the same from those who missed out for their foreseeable future. This system sucks. it's unfair to those who don't know they have to research how to sign up, it's unfair to those who have slower CPUs or connection speeds, it's unfair to those who spend their money and then just end up unlucky. It's unfortunate that those who praise it are those who have found a way to game it, but I do wish they'd show a little empathy for those who were not as quick on the gaming it draw.
    Yes - agree completely. The virtual queue system is just a fast pass for the tech savvy. Of course they love it.

    Dump the virtual queue and level the playing field. If you want to ride, stand in line. What you'll find is, just like EVERY OTHER NEW RIDE, those who have already ridden will quickly move on to other things because of the time required to wait out the line. Right now for the tech savvy there is absolutely no penalty in trying - and if they're good with their phone, the system, and their hand-eye coordination - it's like a free fast pass.

    It is an absolutely ridiculous notion that the daily lines would 'overwhelm' the capacity due to continued interest in riding. Queuing psychology just don't work that way. You'll stand in a long line once - maybe twice - if you've never ridden. But after that, you'll move on to something else. The wait is just too great for the reward. This behavior will free up capacity for others that have never ridden. The whole thing just ticks me off because Disney is well aware of queuing psychology - and they've dumped it for some idiot tech system that allows many to game the system.

    And as I understand it, Josh D'amaro (spelling?) thinks it's a 'solid tool' and wants to continue to use it. Not with my money. If this is the new queue of the future, I'm out. Disney tickets are quite expensive - and even more so without an AP.

    I swear half the time Disney must think its customers are idiots.
     

    Markal

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Aug 1, 2013
    We were at Disney last week. We only had 1 HS day. I missed out at 7, but at 1 I was able to get a late boarding group. The ride was shut down for a couple of hours, and our group was finally called around 7. We waited in line for an hour and 45 minutes. It was a good ride, but I won’t wait that long again. We didn’t think it was worth the wait. It was a madhouse because it was so late in the day and I think people were afraid their group wasn’t going to be called. Personally, we prefer Avatar FOP. But that’s just my opinion.
     

    oktxregulators2020

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Jun 16, 2021
    Yes - agree completely. The virtual queue system is just a fast pass for the tech savvy. Of course they love it.

    Dump the virtual queue and level the playing field. If you want to ride, stand in line. What you'll find is, just like EVERY OTHER NEW RIDE, those who have already ridden will quickly move on to other things because of the time required to wait out the line. Right now for the tech savvy there is absolutely no penalty in trying - and if they're good with their phone, the system, and their hand-eye coordination - it's like a free fast pass.

    It is an absolutely ridiculous notion that the daily lines would 'overwhelm' the capacity due to continued interest in riding. Queuing psychology just don't work that way. You'll stand in a long line once - maybe twice - if you've never ridden. But after that, you'll move on to something else. The wait is just too great for the reward. This behavior will free up capacity for others that have never ridden. The whole thing just ticks me off because Disney is well aware of queuing psychology - and they've dumped it for some idiot tech system that allows many to game the system.

    And as I understand it, Josh D'amaro (spelling?) thinks it's a 'solid tool' and wants to continue to use it. Not with my money. If this is the new queue of the future, I'm out. Disney tickets are quite expensive - and even more so without an AP.

    I swear half the time Disney must think its customers are idiots.
    I don't think dumping everything and opening it up first come first serve will solve the problem. If you do that then that will cause a massive influx of people at Rope Drop then it becomes who can race the fastest to the attraction to get on. I remember back in the day when people were running like crazy at rope drop for certain rides. It doesn't matter which way you change it people are going to get left out. I don't think the behavior will change for this ride anytime soon in the near future.

    As I said before I seriously doubt Disney will change it, they do not want the people sitting in a line for 5 hours for an attraction. They want you walking around to shop and to eat food which is how they make their money. Disney is not making any money if you are standing in a line or half the day.
     


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