Son (24) will be starting a new job in NYC Financial District, where should he live?

lisaviolet

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jul 9, 2002
Ever stay here https://www.themaritimehotel.com/

My friend stayed and sent me photos and I was so jealous. We normally stay midtown just to have easy access in any direction but I'm tempted to check this one out.
No, but that's a lovely terrace.

I have stayed at Club Quarters and Holiday Inn. It really is a peaceful and beautiful area. Love the Esplanade, Battery Park and the Seaport. Just to be surrounded by water.

Man, I am getting homesick and it isn't even my home! :rotfl2:

OP, I would choose to stay somewhere temporarily for a couple of months. And see how he feels with different neighbourhoods and commuting.
 

HopperFan

"It's a bug-eat-bug world out there, princess."
Joined
Sep 6, 2003
No, but that's a lovely terrace.

I have stayed at Club Quarters and Holiday Inn. It really is a peaceful and beautiful area. Love the Esplanade, Battery Park and the Seaport. Just to be surrounded by water.

Man, I am getting homesick and it isn't even my home! :rotfl2:

OP, I would choose to stay somewhere temporarily for a couple of months. And see how he feels with different neighbourhoods and commuting.
I just closed my eyes and I could smell all the different foods, and the flowers when I walked through the flower district .... I so miss it.
 

AlohaNow

DIS Veteran
Joined
Oct 19, 2008
He should do everything within his power to live in Manhattan. If not, then Jersey City/Hoboken, as he'll find lots of recent college grads new to the city there, most commuting to the financial district for their new jobs as well.

He has the rest of his life to raise kids, turn gray, and live in the suburbs. But only one chance to be young in Manhattan.
 

Imzadi

♥ Saved by an angel in a trench coat!
Joined
Oct 29, 2004
Guys, stop the "commuter wars" here. :duck: There are pluses & minuses to every area one recommended to live in. Ultimately, it comes down to the trade-offs the OP's son will find acceptable and can live with. Some will be bottom line, "No way" doing that again. Others will be acceptable. It will be trial and error the first few years to find that out.

OP, I also suggest that your son NOT sign for more than a 1 year lease or roommate situation. And definitely not buy a place to live. He may decide to live somewhere else. A longer lease, while less expensive monthly, ties him into a place that ultimately may not be right for him. Breaking a lease may be more expensive.

The majority of his friends may end up in a different area. He may find he really loves one neighborhood more than others.

NO one mentioned when the commute gets messed up. Google for photos of when people are packed in and stuck in Penn Station or the Path Train or Grand Central Station for HOURS because the trains are messed up due to breakdowns. He HAS to get to work, how WILL he do that on those days? Uber? How much will that cost? A train derailment means that train line may be down for a couple days. Then there's the "snow storms" in the NYC area. A "snow storm" here is about 4 INCHES. People in Buffalo, NY, Chicago, Minnesota, the Dakotas will laugh at that. But, in NYC, a 4 INCH snow storm/Nor'easter can mess up the commute for hours or a full day, even living in one of the 5 boroughs. Is he willing to sometimes have to leave an extra hour or two earlier to make it to work on time?

Also, when one lives by a train schedule, they are TIED to a train schedule. If he works late, there will be less trains than at rush hour. When a bunch of us go out at night, the people who have to take a train have to leave by a certain time. Missing it may mean another one may not be for another hour or more. Then there is having to get up an hour or two even earlier than normal when they know there will be weather delays. So, when do they sleep?

As for driving in, in addition to cost of insurance, the closer one lives, the higher the insurance. DS is under 25, so insurance will be even higher than that. Gas is more expensive closer to the city, and some of the tolls just went up yesterday. Expect all of them to keep rising as they make up for what they lost during COVID. Crossing the George Washington Bridge or Lincoln Tunnel is about $16/day. Then there is the expense of parking in the city if he doesn't work in a building that includes it. Even if he only does that occasionally, down in the financial district, a day parking could be probably $75+.

Yet, living within the 5 boroughs isn't a bowl of cherries either. It's more expensive in every way possible. Every expense adds up. E.V.E.R.Y. Sure, he may be making a great salary, but every expense adds up in a city where everything is more expensive. Real estate is more expensive. A doorman building will be in a better neighborhood.

The better the neighborhood, the more expensive the foods in the supermarkets - which really aren't that big. So, there is less of a selection of items. There are rarely off-brands or cheaper store brands. A can of corn at Walmart is about 59¢ nationally. Walmart is banned in NYC purposely, as they would kill all the mom & pop stores. A can of corn or veggies in Mid-town Manhattan, where I live, is $2. On sale, it's $1.59. Times that by six cans and it's $6 more than nationally. Times that by buying six cans of, say, chick peas too, and it's another extra $6. Times that by everything in NYC and you start getting the idea of the cost of living here.

There is really no such thing as the "dollar menu" at McDonalds or Wendy's. Last time I went in, it was $1.59 for a typical $1 item. And pretty much only the kids juice box is left on that dollar menu. Those national Applebees commercials, where I see entree or appetizer specials for aout $8? Here, it's about $12.99. Last time I went to a movie, pre-COVID, it was $16-$18 for one ticket. That was not including the popcorn or drinks. Bundled cable and Internet, after the first introductory year, is about $200/mo, with no premium channels. A good gym is another $200/mo. Monthly unlimited subway metrocard is $127. Phone would be another expense. If DS doesn't have a doorman, he won't be able to have packages delivered at home. The porch pirates would snatch the packages even before the UPS guy started the truck back up. If DS has packages delivered to work, yet has to hire an Uber to take a lot of packages home, that's another expense. So much for free shipping.

I live in Manhattan because I moved in decades ago when I went to NYU, when Hell's Kitchen/Times Square was quite a seedy, dangerous neighborhood. Back then, one took their lives into their hands when they walked over to my avenue. :duck: :lmao:But, I thought I was invincible back then. The NYC Guardian Angels street vigilante, safety patrol organization started and first headquartered in my neighborhood, as it was so dangerous here. I got an apartment at a great price, under rent control laws and the rent has barely gone up much since. So, it's affordable for me. Otherwise I couldn't live here. Yet, my landlord tried to manufacture ways to evict me TWICE. I had to hire a tenant attorney both times to fight him. My landlord didn't think I'd fight back or would know the law. He was hoping to get me out as he could jack up the price of this place to whatever is the current price. He's done it to other tenants. :sad2:

Subways come to a crawl at night. After midnight, they run about once an hour or so. If one has to take a connecting train, and they don't line up, as they usually won't at that time, one can be waiting on the platform for the first train for an hour, having just missed a train. Then waiting close to an hour for the connecting train. I used to teach at night in Brooklyn. I'd stay late to do my own artwork. But, a subway ride that is 40 minutes during the day became a 2.5 hour ride home if I missed the train right before midnight.

Now, due to COVID, the trains are shut down completely for a few hours overnite, to clean the trains.
Subway ridership is now down by 70%, whereas crime is down in the city by only 50%. People stayed off at first due to COVID, but now due to the massive amount of crimes and types of horrific attacks happening now. That one was about the NINETH subway platform push in several months. When I first moved to NYC, during the "Death Wish" era - the amount of uncontrolled crime which inspired the Charles Bronson series of movies thus named, there was one subway platform push maybe every 2-3 years. The NYC Guardian Angels and NYPD are back to patrolling the subways. But there are not enough of them for every subway or platform. Plus, the attack I linked to, there were two officers on the platform. They only stopped the attacker after the push. The attacker was only charged with attempted murder, as the person she pushed stumbled downward for a split second before pitching forward into the side of the train. That stumble saved the person's life.

Just yesterday, a woman in Brooklyn was grabbed by the arm and was twice nearly pulled off the platform, onto the tracks. Luckily bystanders stopped the guy, But, he got away before police arrived. So, he's free to try again. Men have been pushed and killed onto the tracks too. Many people have moved out of NYC in the past year as crime is on the rise here, both above and below ground with shooting and stabbings. It's NOT just in the usually more dangerous neighborhoods. This is the most dangerous NYC has ever been during the decades I've been here.

Again, there are many factors which may factor into where DS decides is right or acceptable for him.
 
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georgina

DIS Veteran
Joined
Apr 21, 2003
My DS worked near NYU for 2 years and lived in a studio on the Upper East Side, close walk to everything he needed. This was 2014 and he was paying $1875/mo on a 2 year lease. He most definitely did NOT want roommates. Places we looked in Brooklyn seemed too far from the subway for him. He got his company to give him a laptop and moved to the Seattle area to work from home, NYC was really not his kind of place.
 
  • NYCgrrl

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 13, 2017
    OP - I wish your son luck, NYC is a great city especially for a young person with a good career path. I hope he takes every opportunity he can because who knows, like many of us he'll have to leave one day and I wish I had done.





    I don't think anyone is trying to diss where you live and how much you enjoy it. No one has trashed your area, it sound lovely. But what we are trying to say is that a young man starting his career in the financial district should look for something quite close and an easy commute to work. And the plus of those locations is the tremendous amount of things for him to do when not working, where he can meet others his age easily, make friends and enjoy what the city has to offer.

    And we don't know enough about this young man to know his likes. We do know where he will work, the basic business and how much he has to spend on rent. She said he's never been to NYC and I imagine doesn't know anyone. Some of us who went through the same experience, who had to commute into the city are trying to explain just how cumbersome it can be to commute and it's not like it's a $3 train ride to town. How many times we had to leave a dinner or event early to commute home while our workmates continued to enjoy themselves. How many times we wanted to participate in the million things happening but we had to get back out there. How hard it was to meet people because the suburbs are settled with folks native to the area.

    I lived in NJ outside NYC for 13 years. If I had to do it again as a 24 year old (and I was) I would never move to a bedroom community again. I wasn't far, I could see the Twin Towers. But I would move to Manhattan if I had his budget, enjoy everything the city offers from plays, to festivals, to museums, to awesome food .... the energy ... just randomly going out for a long walk to hear street music. So many places to meet people, even the pop up classes in parks. The pluses of all there is to do non-stop, much of it free, outweighs the rent .... that he can afford. And if he chooses the city, it's not permanent. He can use some weekends to check out some suburb areas.




    Yankees or Mets or Braves. Some of us have been through this exact thing without having any ties to the Yankees or the Mets. We were also outsiders. We have had to make these decisions, and know the pros and cons of these decisions. Unlike the Yankees or Mets who will die on that hill .... we look at all the parameters. Play ball!



    So true in so many areas. We experienced this. I think if he moved farther out than the river side cities he would be very lonely.



    I so miss NYC fights! Not the bullets on the subway platform but the corner shout matches.


    OP ... I always felt very safe in the city, I walked about an hour from my office to my husbands in SOHO each evening.



    Ah I lived in Montclair and GlenRidge. That is where the $400 monthly commute comes in to play. I think they are great cities if you don't work in NYC.
    Every week I read the NYT Metropolitan Diary column and cackle mightily 😎

    @ disneyjunkie- BS in the house! Born at St. John’s Episcopal 👍🏾
     

    Donald13

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Mar 25, 2020
    I have nothing to add here - I'm just here for the NYC fights. popcorn::
    Same. Was not disappointed. I am amazed at what people will fight over. As for the op, Long Island is right outside the city and it a short commute by train.
     

    HopperFan

    "It's a bug-eat-bug world out there, princess."
    Joined
    Sep 6, 2003
    Every week I read the NYT Metropolitan Diary column and cackle mightily 😎
    Please accept these 💐 as a thank you for that tidbit. I subscribe to NYT but read on my phone. Have never seen that section and now I shall be falling down the rabbit hole.
     

    allison443

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 13, 2002
    Congratulations on the new job for your son!! All three of my kids lived/live in Hoboken and worked in NYC as young adults. They love it! Two are living there currently. It’s great for recent grads/young people! There is a variety of housing options and the commute to NY is good. My kids have lived in older walk ups, one is currently in a really nice luxury building with rent around $2100 for a one bedroom, the other one (recent grad) lives in a large 3 bedroom in an older building with two college friends and pays around $1000 as her share.
    We live in a NJ suburb and they commuted from here via train for a few months after graduation. It got old fast! I’m very happy they live in Hoboken and I enjoy visiting them there!
     
  • DisneyTarheel

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 12, 2005
    My son just got a new job and will be working in lower Manhattan, he is getting mixed messages from his friends on where to live. He has never been to the city. Should he be looking close to work or commuting from one of the boroughs? He will be making good money and he 'thinks' he wants to live by himself.

    Any help is appreciated. Should he live close to work or commute and if commute from where??
    TIA
    Some financial district jobs have absolutely brutal hours. If this will be him, he will not want a long commute.
     

    mamamary

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 11, 2006
    I traveled to Downtown NYC for 5 years - lived in Park Slope (Windsor Terrace) many years ago. Two minute walk to the train station - and 30 minutes to Manhattan - give or take via F train. The area has become hot as well as many other areas in Brooklyn - not sure what the rents are but it was very convenient to NYC. Hopefully a studio apartment and he can be on his own. I would go back there in a heartbeat. It's a lovely area. It's a mini/new Manhattan.

    You or your son can post on the city data forum with questions also/more specific to areas. I have a friend (33) who also lives in Queens and is a quick ride to NYC. There are many other areas of course, but I can only speak for the areas I know. Even where I am now, commute not too bad but longer and more $.

    Good luck and congratulations to your son.
    Hi. I lived in Park Slope too. Not far from Windsor Terrace! My mom still is there now so I visit Park Slope often.
     

    SirDuff

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 19, 2014
    No, but that's a lovely terrace.

    I have stayed at Club Quarters and Holiday Inn. It really is a peaceful and beautiful area. Love the Esplanade, Battery Park and the Seaport. Just to be surrounded by water.

    Man, I am getting homesick and it isn't even my home! :rotfl2:

    OP, I would choose to stay somewhere temporarily for a couple of months. And see how he feels with different neighbourhoods and commuting.
    I usually stay at the Conrad (since before it was a Conrad). I love the area as well (running up the WSH or down and around Seaport are some of my favourite runs).
     

    tinkerdorabelle

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 7, 2001
    HOPPERFAN You do not have to explain to me about commuting, my husband commutes to NYC every day. We actually live walkable to the train and walkable to restaurants, bars, art galleries, stores, etc. Too many towns up along the Hudson to mention, all like this. It was just an idea for the OP to check out. That is all. Just an option, I never said it was best, I have no idea what is best for the OP and her son and and neither does anyone else but I take issue with people saying things about it they know nothing of. It is cheaper, safer, there are tons to do, healthier and away from the ugly of the City. It is popular with young professionals. Just an option for OP to check out, never said your options were bad or mine better. But we here would never live or want to live closer as it is easy commute if you don't mind commuting even with $400 a month it is much cheaper and many young people love living close to hiking, kayaking, and the outdoors and would save even with commute. Many may not. It is an option for OP
     
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    Donald13

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Mar 25, 2020
    HOPPERFAN You do not have to explain to me about commuting, my husband commutes to NYC every day. We actually live walkable to the train and walkable to restaurants, bars, art galleries, stores, etc. Too many towns up along the Hudson to mention, all like this. It was just an idea for the OP to check out. That is all. Just an option, I never said it was best, I have no idea what is best for the OP and her son and and neither does anyone else but I take issue with people saying things about it they know nothing of. It is cheaper, safer, there are tons to do, healthier and away from the ugly of the City. It is popular with young professionals. Just an option for OP to check out, never said your options were bad or mine better. But we here would never live or want to live closer as it is easy commute if you don't mind commuting even with $400 a month it is much cheaper and many young people love living close to hiking, kayaking, and the outdoors and would save even with commute. Many may not. It is an option for OP
    The ignore feature is wonderful for this.
     

    zeferjen

    Mother Knows Best
    Joined
    Jan 18, 2010
    I am old as dirt now but when I was in your son's shoes I moved to Astoria in Queens. It was a little rougher then than it is now but it was a pretty easy commute and I could get to Manhattan quickly and safely. When I made a little more money I moved to Hoboken and then Jersey City and took the PATH into the city. The only thing I recommend is spend some time exploring neighborhoods and see what fits his budget and interests.
     

    Skippy918

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 29, 2012
    I am old as dirt now but when I was in your son's shoes I moved to Astoria in Queens. It was a little rougher then than it is now but it was a pretty easy commute and I could get to Manhattan quickly and safely. When I made a little more money I moved to Hoboken and then Jersey City and took the PATH into the city. The only thing I recommend is spend some time exploring neighborhoods and see what fits his budget and interests.
    My cousin lived in Astoria for a little while. It was more recent and the town is trendy now.
     

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